Materials

Aluminium

Aluminium is a widely used metal with a number of advantages, it is recognised for being both lightweight and flexible.

Aluminium can be 3dprinted, casted, melted, formed, machined and extruded, meaning that it can be manufactured into a variety of shapes and then subsequently fabricated to suit a whole variety of uses.

When selecting a material, consider the material properties, manufacturability characteristics, cosmetic appearance, and cost.

Materials

Aluminium

Aluminium is a widely used metal with a number of advantages, it is recognised for being both lightweight and flexible.

Aluminium can be 3dprinted, casted, melted, formed, machined and extruded, meaning that it can be manufactured into a variety of shapes and then subsequently fabricated to suit a whole variety of uses.

When selecting a material, consider the material properties, manufacturability characteristics, cosmetic appearance, and cost.

Select the Right Manufacturing Solution

Aluminium | 3D Printing
Manufacturing Process:

Aluminium (AlSi10Mg)

Tensile Strength (MPa) ≥330
Yield Strength (MPa) ≥245
Elongation at Break (%) 5.0%
Hardness (Brinell) 80
Density (g/cm³) 2.67

Actual figures may vary depending on the construction state.

An aluminium alloy called AlSi10Mg has excellent thermal and mechanical qualities, is light, and has numerous post-processing options. The automobile, aerospace, and automation industries frequently employ it because of these factors. Examples of applications for prototypes and manufacturing include housings, ducting, engine components, production tools, and moulds.

Due to component geometry, there may be strong tensions that result in part distortion that might result in a larger divergence. Orientation- or surface-specific values for surface roughness Rougher surfaces will be those that face downward and those that have support.

The printed state of values is represented. Heat therapy is not used to relieve stress. The mechanical characteristics will be affected by the heat treatment for stress reduction.

Key Product Benefits

  • High stiffness and strength relative to weight
  • Thermal and electrical conductivity

Aluminium (6061)

Tensile Strength (MPa) ≥280
Yield Strength (MPa) ≥230
Elongation at Break (%) 11.0%
Hardness (Brinell) 60
Density (g/cm³) 2.74

Actual figures may vary depending on the construction state.

Aluminium 6061 is widely used in various industries, including aerospace, automotive, and consumer electronics, due to its high strength-to-weight ratio and good machinability. It is often used for structural components and parts that require good mechanical properties.

It has excellent machinability. It is easy to work with in various manufacturing processes. It can be easily cut, drilled, and formed, allowing for efficient machining and fabrication.

It exhibits good resistance to corrosion. It forms a thin and protective oxide layer on its surface, which helps protect it from environmental factors.

Also, it is highly weldable using various techniques. It can be joined to itself or other aluminium alloys using appropriate welding procedures and filler materials.

Key Product Benefits

  • High strength relative to weight
  • Thermal and electrical conductivity
  • Excellent machinability
  • Exhibits good resistance to corrosion
  • Highly weldable

Technical Specifications

Requirement Specification
Maximum build size 280 x 280 x 350 mm
Standard lead time 3-5 business days
Dimensional accuracy ± 0.1% with a lower limit on ± 0.1 mm
Layer height 100-300 μm

Available Surface Finishes

Standard:  Sand surfaces to remove build lines and bead blasted.

Anodized:  Electrochemical process that converts the metal surface into a decorative, durable, corrosion-resistant, anodic oxide finish

Heat Treated:  Use of heating or chilling, normally to extreme temperatures, to achieve a desired result such as hardening or softening of a material

Polished:  Sand surfaces to remove build lines and then apply polishing compound until desired surface finish is reached.

Metal Plated: Aluminum can be plated with a wide range of metals to increase its corrosion resistance, increase wear resistance, or improve overall aesthetics. Both electroplating and electroless plating are possible. Some common metals include tin, nickel, electroless nickel, gold, and silver.

Powder Coating: Powder coating is a robust option for coloring aluminum sheet metal parts while also adding a measure of corrosion resistance.

Additional post-processing: Includes CNC milling, lathing & EDM

 

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Manufacturing Process:

CNC Machining

Due to its light weight and good strength-to-weight ratio, aluminium is the perfect material for situations where metallic-level strength is needed but mass is still an issue. Each aluminium alloy is identified by the first number in their categorization. The numeral denotes the primary alloying components.

AL 6061/ 0.025/0.05/0.1 mm

6061 Aluminum is a high quality precipitation-hardened and stretched aluminum alloy, its strength is not as strong as 2 series or 7 series, but its good combination of properties, primarily composed of magnesium and silicon, hence it can be used in a variety of project types.

 

Aluminium 6061

Aluminium of this grade is regarded as an all-purpose alloy. It can be easily welded and has great machinability qualities. Magnesium and silicon are the two main alloying components. This aluminium alloy is frequently used to create bicycle frames, brake pistons, and electrical connections.

Aluminum 6061 Properties

Tensile Strength, Yield (MPa) 276
Fatigue Strength (MPa) 96.5
Elongation at Break (%) 17
Hardness (Brinell) 95
Density (g/cm³) 2.7

Aluminium 7075

High strength aluminum is superior than mild steel in cold working. It is one of the most often utilized aluminum alloys for structural applications that are subject to high stresses.

This alloy is excellent for applications that experience cyclic loading because it has excellent fatigue resistance and is slightly stronger than 7050 aluminum. Its primary alloying component is zinc, and its common uses include shaft keys, aviation fittings, and meter shafts and gears.

Aluminum 7075 Properties

Tensile Strength, Yield (MPa) 503
Fatigue Strength (MPa) 159
Elongation at Break (%) 11
Hardness (Brinell) 150
Density (g/cm³) 2.81

Aluminium 5052

The main alloying component of this aluminum alloy is magnesium. Due to the lack of copper in its makeup, it is extremely corrosion-resistant but cannot be heat-treated. Fuel tanks, sheet metal components, and fuel/oil lines are frequently constructed out of aluminum 5052.

Aluminum 5052 Properties

Tensile Strength, Yield (MPa) 193
Fatigue Strength (MPa) 117
Elongation at Break (%) 18
Hardness (Brinell) 60
Density (g/cm³) 2.68


Manufacturing Process:

 

You must decide which aluminum casting alloys to utilize while working with aluminum. To assist you better understand your alloy selections and the reasons behind our preference for particular alloys, we have included some technical information on aluminum alloys.

 

Aluminium A380

A380 is the most often used alloy for aluminum die casting. Because it is lightweight, very strong at high temperatures, and corrosion-resistant, A380 possesses the finest possible combination of physical and mechanical qualities for casting. A380 has strong electrical and thermal conductivity and is excellent at maintaining dimensional stability even with complicated geometries and thin walls.

A380 Aluminum Alloy Properties

Tensile Strength, Yield (MPa) 324/160
Shear Strength (MPa) 190
Elongation (% in 50mm) 3.5
Hardness (Brinell) 80
Density (g/cm³) 2.71

Aluminium A383

Utilizing aluminum alloy A383 is an additional choice for die casters. This alloy is normally only utilized when complex components need to be formed and highly certain die-filling properties are needed. Although it lacks some of the characteristics of the A380, it offers greater strength at high temperatures and a lower risk of cracking from heat.

A383 Aluminum Alloy Properties

Tensile Strength, Yield (MPa) 310/150
Elongation (% in 50mm) 3.5
Hardness (Brinell) 75
Density (g/cm³) 2.74

Aluminium A360

Because A360 is more difficult to cast than A380, many die casters steer clear of it. Depending on your casting demands and abilities, you might want to take this alloy into consideration because it does offer higher strength at high temperatures, better ductility, and improved corrosion resistance.

A360 Aluminum Alloy Properties

Tensile Strength, Yield (MPa) 317/170
Shear Strength (MPa) 180
Elongation (% in 50mm) 3.5
Hardness (Brinell) 75
Density (g/cm³) 2.63

ZA Alloys

For your die casting, some applications can require ZA, or zinc aluminum alloys. Scientists have improved this sort of alloy, which was formerly the main alloy used in gravity casting and is now effectively employed in die casting. ZA-8, ZA-12, and ZA-27 are the three alloys that fit within this group. In comparison to other zinc alloys, alloys made of zinc and aluminum have higher strengths, lower densities, better creep resistance, and superior wear resistance.

 

ZA-8

The only hot chamber alloy among the three is ZA-8. The lowest possible aluminum percentage is found in the zinc-aluminum alloy used in die casting. 8.4% of the weight is made up of aluminum, while 1% is copper. ZA-8 has a lower melting point and a higher density compared to other zinc-aluminum alloys because it contains less aluminum. Because of this, it is perfect for hot-chamber die casting. When increased strength needs necessitate plating, it is frequently employed.

 

ZA-12

ZA-12 offers a sometimes-desirable mediation of zinc alloy qualities since it has a slightly higher aluminum content than ZA-8 but a slightly lower aluminum content than ZA-27. Its aluminum content is 11% and its copper content is 1%. It offers the ZA alloys’ finest balance of castability and strength. If you’re casting with ZA-12, you must employ the cold-chamber technique due of its greater melting point and lower density.

 

ZA-27

The strongest of the three ZA alloys is ZA-27, but it is challenging to cast. With a 27 percent aluminum content and a 2.2 percent copper percentage, it has the highest aluminum content of all the zinc-aluminum alloys we utilize for die casting. The end product has the highest melting point, greatest strength, and lowest density of any material.

Parts manufactured with ZA-27, in contrast to other zinc-aluminum alloys, are frequently not the best candidates for chrome plating. Due of its high melting point, this alloy, like ZA-12, cannot be used with hot-chamber casting. Die casting for ZA-27 can have problems with inside shrinkage, thus cooling rates must be carefully considered.

Manufacturing Process:
Sheet Metal Fabrication

Due to its light weight and ease of fabrication, aluminum is a good choice for sheet metal applications. Not all aluminum alloys, it should be emphasized, are suitable for sheet metal fabrication. Some aluminum alloys with higher strengths will tear or break before they bend. The more a material’s yield and tensile strengths differ from one another, the more challenging it will be to bend. Some of the more popular grades of aluminum used for sheet metal components are listed below.

Aluminum 5052

The main alloying component of this aluminum alloy is magnesium. Since it contains no copper, it has high corrosion resistance. Despite not being able to be heat treated, alloy 5052 has the highest strength among those that cannot be heated. Additionally, this alloy can be formed more easily than series 3 alloys. Fuel tanks, as well as signs for roads and highways, are popular uses.

Aluminum 5052 Standard Gauges

Material Standard Sheet Thicknesses
Aluminum 5052 H32 0.020”, 0.025”, 0.032”, 0.040”,0.050”, 0.063”, 0.080”, 0.090”, 0.100”, 0.125”, 0.160”, 0.188”, 0.250”, 0.375”, 0.500”

Aluminum 5052 Properties

Tensile Strength / Yield (MPa) 193
Shear Strength (MPa) 117
Elongation (% in 50mm) 18
Hardness (Brinell) 80
Density (g/cm³) 2.68

Aluminum 6061

This is one of the most versatile aluminum alloys. Magnesium and silicon are the two main alloying elements, and heat treatment is acceptable. After it has reached high tempering levels, bending aluminum 6061 is not advised because it is likely to crack. While this aluminum alloy can be used for sheet metal components, some caution and preparation are needed.

Aluminum 6061 Standard Gauges

Material Standard Sheet Thicknesses
Aluminum 6061 T6 0.016”, 0.020”, 0.025”, 0.032”, 0.040”, 0.050”, 0.063”, 0.080”, 0.090”, 0.100”, 0.125”, 0.160”, 0.190”, 0.250”, 0.313”, 0.375”, 0.500”, 0.625”, 0.750”, 0.750”, 0.875”, 1.000”

Aluminum 6061 Properties

Tensile Strength / Yield (MPa) 276
Shear Strength (MPa) 96.5
Elongation (% in 50mm) 17
Hardness (Brinell) 95
Density (g/cm³) 2.7

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